UK's first subsidy-free solar opened in Bedfordshire

The solar farm will generate enough electricity for about 2,500 homes, its backers said.

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8 Experiential Marketing Campaigns That Will Give You Serious Event Envy

Work events are really hit or miss. Let’s be honest: How many times have you found yourself anxiously fidgeting with a paper napkin in the corner of a stuffy networking happy hour?

That’s why I was not only relieved, but also surprised and delighted, when I attended a holiday

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10 Pure CSS Call-To-Action Button Sets

Every website and landing page should have a clear call-to-action button. This encourages the user to click and perform an action, whether to make a purchase, start a trial, or sign up for an account.

There is no single best way to design a CTA and you can use many different styles, from large gradients to ghost buttons, and everything inbetween. But other factors like color, size, and position also have an affect on usability.

I’ve hand-picked 10 of my favorite CTA designs, all built with pure CSS. If you’re looking for CTA inspiration, then you’re bound to find something in this collection.

1. Floating Button

Here’s one of the most unique styles I’ve seen and it’s certainly not common on the web. This floating button could become a staple for landing pages that mesh nicely with the design.

It uses a CSS3 drop shadow along with a repeating animation to create the floating effect. This all runs through CSS which makes it even easier to replicate for your own project.

Granted, the hover effect is a bit dull, although the actual button design itself more than makes up for this. Plus you can always expand the hover effect to include other CSS3 animations if you’re willing to push the envelope.

2. Green Circled CTA

You’ll find plenty of CTAs like this on landing pages promoting offers or ebooks. They often use the red hand-drawn circle effect to make it blend into the page and seem more natural to click.

What’s cool about this green CTA button is the hover effect animation. It works on both the button and the red squiggles in the background. Certainly not the effect you’d assume at first glance!

But for a real easy CTA, that’s sure to grab attention, you should try this out. And since the button uses pure CSS you can easily change the color scheme to match any layout.

3. Material Button

If you like working with Google’s material design then you’ll love this unique button set. It’s built in one single style but offers two different triggers: mouse hover and click.

The button snippet uses SCSS/Sass for CSS code, but you can compile it down into CSS right from CodePen. This makes it easier to copy/paste the code for personal use if you’re not a big Sass fan.

The animation effects mimic Google’s design guidelines, so this set is brilliant for any material web project you might be creating.

4. Colorful CTAs

Super small and easy-to-use best describes this button set created by developer Rohan Nair.

The color choices are made to match but you can always change the scheme in CSS. The real eye-catching effect here is the click animation that moves the button “down” into the page.

This gives the illusion of depth and helps each button stand out from other elements on the page.

Again this all uses pure CSS, so it’s a pretty easy button set to copy and customize.

5. Micro Interaction Button

If you want even greater button animation effects take a peek at these microinteraction buttons designed by Phil Hoyt.

They use Font Awesome for the arrow icons mixed with custom CSS animations. While hovering any button, the text label animates out of view and instead displays the icon font prominently.

Depending on your CTA design this may not work as well, especially if you can’t find an icon to represent the button behavior. clearly

Although if you can work this into your site, the hover effect is bound to grab attention.

6. Bordered Buttons

I found these bordered buttons while skimming CodePen and they immediately stood out from the herd.

They don’t inherently feel like CTAs, but with larger text or a larger button size these little designs could dominate a header with ease.

Each button uses the CSS translate() method along with custom background colors to create the border effect. It’s a fairly complicated technique but it’s also the best method considering a plain CSS border wouldn’t animate the same way.

If you like these designs and want to give them a shot, they should run smoothly in every modern web browser.

7. Gradient Styles

Classic gradient buttons will never go out of style and they’re used prominently in larger frameworks like Bootstrap.

With these gradient buttons you can easily update the hover & click animations all while keeping true to the color format. It uses LESS CSS which makes it easier to darken gradient colors using percentages rather than hex codes.

I always like gradient buttons so long as they blend with a layout. And these certainly aren’t the only gradient styles you’ll find so check CodePen if you’re looking for more.

8. YouTube Call to Action

Here’s a rather unique CTA that leads to a YouTube video. It’s a fixed badge in the lower-right corner of the screen and while hovering you can see the video CTA appear on top.

It’s a pretty simple design but it’s not going to be useful on every web page. It can be used to promote deals, new releases, and of course links to other sites like YouTube.

But if you’re looking for a prominent CTA button for your page header, this template won’t help much. Still a very unique idea and certainly worth saving if you could ever use something like this in the future.

9. Flip-Down Buttons

3D animations for the web are easy to create if you know what you’re doing. But even if you don’t understand CSS it’s just as easy to copy 3D code snippets like these flip-down buttons made by Arnie McKinnis.

They’re built on LESS, but you can turn that into plain CSS right inside CodePen. The buttons rely on CSS transforms to create the 3D effect which only appears on mouse hover.

It’s a pretty unique design because the CTA itself is technically “under” the button. Hovering only displays the clickable link underneath making the colorful button more of a fancy shell to grab attention.

But if you like the 3D animated effect, definitely give this a try on your own site.

10. Pure CSS Hovers

Rather than focusing on a unique design or color scheme these pure CSS buttons offer custom hover animations.

They all look similar to typical ghost buttons where you have a border color and no internal color. But while hovering you’ll notice each button’s border style animates into something new.

It’s a tricky effect to get right, and it’s not something you can just pick up and customize without some effort. Although if you know your way around CSS, you should figure it out pretty quickly.

11. Pulsing CTA

If you’re looking to consistently grab attention from visitors then try this pulsing CTA design. It uses a delay via CSS to create a repeating pulse animation with an outer glow.

But if you dive into the CSS code, you can change the pulse animation to be anything you like. It’s pretty versatile, and of course, it should blend in nicely with any design.

Also if you click the “X” icon in the corner you’ll get to see the full animation effect all over again. This loads the button into view along with the window so it even has a cool animation for the first pageload.

Most websites use pure CSS buttons these days so it’s not all that difficult to find one you like and clone the code for a kick-ass CTA.

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Top 5 Finish Sends 2 Crew to Round of 12

One race still remains in the Round of 16, but Brad Keselowski has already secured his spot in the Round of 12 in the Monster Energy NASCAR Cup Series Playoffs.
The No. 2 Miller Lite Ford Fusion team ran a brilliant race at one of its bread-and-butter tracks, New Hampshire Motor Speedway. Though he didn’t lead a lap, BK ran near the front all afternoon in the ISM Connect 300, and he crossed in fourth place for

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Toolmaker gives to hurricane releif

Apex also donated use of a 350,000-square-foot warehouse for two months to nonprofit Trusted World to distribute Harvey relief donations.

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Panda's habitat 'shrinking and becoming more fragmented'

Despite signs that numbers of giant pandas are rising, suitable habitat has shrunk, satellite data shows.

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18 Personal Websites to Inspire Your Own

List of Blogging Websites

HubSpot.com
WordPress.com
Squarespace.com
Medium.com
Wix.com
Typepad.com
Tumblr.com

Ah, the job search.
Some refer to it as a full-time job in itself. Others compare it to dating. And several cats over at BuzzFeed think it just plain

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12 Incredible UX Designer Portfolio Sites

Design portfolios are fairly easy to set up. You can build project grids or add visual case studies to showcase your work, and the quality is immediately visible.

With UX design, it’s a little tougher because it’s often about the process and the results on each project. To craft a great UX portfolio I recommend studying others to get ideas.

This collection is by no means a complete collection of UX designer portfolio sites. But it’s an excellent place to start looking for ideas and studying how other UX designers present their work.

1. Hanna Jung

hanna jung ux designer

Hanna’s portfolio site offers a minimalist style with a primary focus on the work. It uses plenty of visuals to sell projects but it doesn’t feel like “just” a UX portfolio.

The header and tagline clarify exactly what Hanna does, and this is probably the best way to grab attention. If you’re designing a portfolio site for yourself always try to share what you do early, so visitors know what they’re looking at.

Each project photo inside the grid links to an internal page with more info. You can turn this into a detailed photo gallery, a quick synopsis, or even a detailed case study. But offering more info about each project on a separate page is never a bad idea.

2. Adham Dannaway

adham dannaway ux portfolio

Many people know Adham Dannaway’s site because it’s been featured in galleries across the web. And for good reason!

His homepage uses a brilliant graphic illustrating the type of work he does: both design and code.

There’s a significant overlap between UI designers and UX designers, so a lot of freelancers position themselves in this overlap. It makes you more valuable to a client who may want to hire for both skills, or just one knowing both skills worth off each other.

But the real reason Adham’s portfolio works so well is the internal structure of his portfolio project pages. Check out this one as an example. Notice how it reads in a linear fashion and helps sell the work done on that project.

Definitely the best choice for anyone launching a UX portfolio site from scratch.

3. Val Head

val head ux portfolio

Val Head is a well-known designer with a specialty in UI/UX animations along with interaction design. Her portfolio site is a testament to all the work she does.

And you’ll notice the homepage doesn’t use a single image beyond her logo.

The structure immediately grabs your attention whether it’s focused on Val’s newsletter, her speaking engagements, or her recent blog articles. A fantastic design showing how you can sell your UX work without many visuals at all.

4. Paul Lapkin

paul lapkin designer site

Some designers don’t feel comfortable adding their personal photos onto their portfolio. Others like it because it adds personality and gives visitors a chance to see who they are.

Paul Lapkin uses a fullscreen header background portrait that immediately grabs attention. The heading text describes his work as a UI+UX designer along with further details underneath.

This intro text is meant to grab your attention and leave you wanting more. The “view work” link is pretty clear, and if you can write copy that also grabs attention this style might work for you too.

5. Nick Finck

nick finck portfolio

Nick Finck has a much more traditional website with a clear header, navigation, and footer area. Not all modern portfolios look like this but this layout works well and has for years.

One thing I really like on the homepage is the header section with Nick’s photo. This includes two CTAs that encourage you to dig deeper into Nick’s work.

A lot of his portfolio’s essence is in the writing and in his past project work for companies like Adobe and Google. This means it’s less about selling and more about building connections with potential clients.

6. Christina Richardson

christina richardson portfolio

A while back I was browsing through portfolios and found Christina Richardson’s site.

This has always been a favorite of mine for a few reasons. It naturally has a sense of personality, but it doesn’t feel too cluttered or heavily customized. The whole site runs as a single-page design so it’s super easy to navigate too.

But I also really like the UX timeline feature since it’s a visual representation of work experience.

This feels a lot more user-friendly than a boring resume, but it gets the same message across. Very UX-y if I do say so myself.

7. Ionut Zamfir

ionut zamfir portfolio design

Split-page designs work well if you have the right photos. Ionut Zamfir follows this trend brilliantly in his UX design portfolio.

Background images litter each section of the page and you’ll even find a slideshow featuring pics of his work.

It’s definitely a simple website, but sometimes that’s all you need. Some visuals to help sell, information about the designer and a contact form.

8. Kevin M. Hoffman

kevin m hoffman ux portfolio

Other than photos you can also use contrast and colors to grab attention. That’s what you’ll find on Kevin Hoffman’s site which also breaks the page up with horizontal block sections.

Text is pretty easy to read and it doesn’t follow any particular formula. Not to mention the colors don’t exactly match, but they also don’t clash either.

I’d call this an experimental portfolio layout, but it does serve its purpose.

9. Simon Pan

simon pan ux designer

The portfolio site of Simon Pan is one of the best places for case study layouts. You can learn so much just going through his portfolio and reading through his case studies.

With UX design it’s more about selling your knowledge through the process. Clients want to know what you did on a project and how you solved problems for past clients.

Simon’s copywriting is exquisite, and it helps sell his work well. This is one of the best skills you can pick up if you’re pushing towards a case study mentality.

10. Adrian Zumbrunnen

adrian zumbrunnen portfolio site

With a unique combination of minimalism and dynamic effects, this portfolio is certainly eye-catching.

Adrian Zumbrunnen uses a dark + light color scheme that feels typical of many design portfolios.

But he includes other elements like bold CTA buttons, links to video recordings of his talks, and even an illustration of himself. Pretty unique!

11. Ramin Nasibov

ramin nasibov portfolio

Ramin Nasibov follows a typical grid layout that works well on visual designer’s portfolios. This site is real easy to browse and it works nicely on mobile too(along with other grid-style layouts!)

One thing I would like to see on Ramin’s homepage is more info about himself. But he does so much work in the design space that it makes sense to focus solely on the work.

If you’re trying to draw more attention to your work instead of yourself I recommend a grid-style layout just like this.

12. Nishtha Mehrotra

nishtha mehrotra designer portfolio

On Nishtha Mehrotra’s site you’ll find a nice mix of everything. It uses a custom hero header with animations, a visual portfolio grid, and a clean contact section with an email and a phone number.

The site feels incredibly professional, and it has been designed with the user in mind. Single page portfolios are often better if you can fit everything you want to say onto one page.

I also like the resume section which feels a lot easier to browse than a PDF doc. Overall a really clean site, and well worth studying if you’re going for the single-page portfolio look.

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SMACNA returns to Hawaii for 74th annual convention

Hawaii might seem like a slightly curious choice for the Sheet Metal and Air-Conditioning Contractors’ National Association’s annual conference.

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The winners of 2017's Insight Astronomy Photographer award

Judges has to choose between 3,800 entries from all over the world.

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